non-romantic subplots.

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I think I can speak for a lot of people – especially aromantic and asexual people – that romance (and sex!) are pretty boring subplots when they’re used constantly. In a book of my life, my subplot or plot B wouldn’t be about finding True Love or something like that…. so why does it have to be everyone’s?

Here’s am example: Jughead Jones in the Riverdale tv show. Jughead is asexual and aromantic, which is canon via the comics. So while his subplots in the show are 1) dating Betty and 2) joining a gang or whatever, they should be a lot different. Like…. food, because obviously my boy Jughead is in love with food more than he is with people.

So, I’ve compiled a list of other subplots that could be used instead of the really boring and stereotype-y “s/he finds love!!!”

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why is diversity so important?

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In all my time as a writer and reader, I’ve heard a lot of people ask why diversity in books (and tv shows, and movies) is important. Whether it’s for people of color, disabled people, mentally ill people, or lgbtqia+ people, people want diversity. And a lot of people don’t get why.

From about age 7, I had a role model in a book series that I liked. Like me, she had brown hair. She was white*. She liked books. She liked learning. And if you can guess where this is going, her name was Hermione Granger.

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